Fact Sheets and FAQs

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CCR Factsheets and Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) are in-depth, conceptual looks at cases, issues and policies. The resources cover a variety of areas, and aim to move beyond the boundaries of specific cases to address some of the root issues and causes. Most Factsheets and FAQs are also available to download as pdf's so that they can be easily printed and distributed.

This list can be ordered by date or name, and filtered by the issues to which the Factsheet relates.

  1. FAQs: The Military Commisions Act

    The Military Commissions Act of 2006 (MCA) is a massive legislative assault on fundamental rights, including the right to habeas corpus – the right to challenge one’s detention in a court of law. Signed into…

  2. FAQs: What Is Habeas Corpus

    Habeas corpus, or the Great Writ, is the legal procedure that keeps the government from holding you indefinitely without showing cause. When you challenge your detention by filing a habeas corpus petition, the executive branch…

  3. FAQs: What Are Ghost Detentions and Black Sites

    Soon after September 11, reports began appearing that people were being picked up around the world and held by the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). These people weren’t being held by their own countries’ intelligence or…

  4. Factsheet: Home Demolitions and Caterpillar

    Since its occupation of the West Bank, the Gaza Strip, and East Jerusalem following the 1967 war, the Israel Defense Force (IDF) has destroyed more than 18,000 Palestinian homes in the Occupied Palestinian Territory (OPT).…

  5. Factsheet: Corporate Exploitation and the Prison System

    Since 1999, the Center for Constitutional Rights (CCR) has been fighting on the ground and in the courts to end the exploitative telephone contract between New York State and MCI/Verizon which charged family members 630…

  6. Factsheet: Alien Tort Statute

    The Alien Tort Statute

  7. Factsheet: Material Support

    The “material support” statute, 18 U.S.C. § 2339B, makes it a crime (punishable by up to 10 years in prison) to provide “material support” to any foreign organization the Secretary of State has designated as…

  8. Factsheet: Universal Jurisdiction

    The principle of universal jurisdiction allows the national authorities of any state to investigate and prosecute people for serious international crimes even if they were committed in another country. For example, this means that the…